ABOUT

FEEDS

CONTACT

  • .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
  • Here are some frequently asked questions emailed to me you might want to read first.

EMAIL DIGEST

    For a daily update of Candy Blog reviews, enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner

CANDY RATINGS

TYPE

BRAND

COUNTRY

ARCHIVES

Saturday, June 23, 2007

This Week in Candy - Deadlines & Winners

Posting was a little light this week as I have visitors in town.

  • If you’re interested in a little behind the scenes for candy sellers, here’s a video about CandyWarehouse.com, run by Christopher Pratt. The video is part of a contest Yahoo Search Marketing is running, kind of like “American Idol” for internet retailers. There are some other interesting videos & products mentioned and how they sell on the web, including Crooked Houses and Alpha Grip (it’s like a keyboard in the shape of a video game controller). Of course it’d be cool if CandyWarehouse won (full disclosure, I take photos for their website and they often advertise on Candy Blog) ... so stop by and vote if you have a moment. Voting ends Sunday night.
  • image

     

  • The long-awaited announcement of the winner of the Elvis Cups giveaway is Lisa (comment #101)! This was the second draw, the winner of the first drawing I did never responded to my emails. Five Banana Creme and Peanut Butter Cups will be ambling their way to her this week!
  •  

  • Monday, June 25th is the deadline for feedback to the FDA on the Don’t Mess with our Chocolate campaign. If you haven’t taken the chance to tell the FDA how you feel about the purity and continuity of your food, read up on it here and here.
  •  

  • I Heart Candy is over at YumSugar and the list of of sweets lovin’ posts is extensive! Have a look. I heart these posts: Bertie Bott’s Jelly Bean Roulette (a fun game for summer camp) and the pure simplicity of Pretzels + Kisses + M&Ms.

    Here’s the recap of Candy Blog reviews this week:

    Monday: Skittles from the UK (8 out of 10)

    Tuesday: Good & Plenty Fresh from the Factory (9 out of 10)

    Wednesday: Twisted Energy Bar versus Take 5 (2 out of 10 & 9 out of 10)

    Friday: Tootsie Pop - Regular & Supersized (9 out of 10 & 7 out of 10)

    Weekly Average: 7.33 ... 33% chocolate content.

    POSTED BY Cybele AT 12:35 pm     CandyFun StuffComments (1)

  • Friday, June 22, 2007

    Tootsie Pops - Regular & Super Sized

    Tootsie PopsAfter a recent writing session on a new play (for Script Frenzy) I stopped at the 7-11 near the coffee house where I was holed up to see what they had. I didn’t see much new, except for these gargantuan Tootsie Pops.

    I picked up two, in my favorite flavors, Orange and Grape and thought I’d compare them to the classic sized ones.

    The big ones are .85 ounces and regulars are .60 ounces.

    Tootsie PopsI did try to compare the center of the Tootsie Pops, in case the hard candy proportion was the only difference. As far as I could tell, there was a slightly larger amount of Tootsie Roll at the center of the .85 ounce one but it was consistent with the larger amount of hard candy ... so they got the proportions right.

    But here’s the thing ... there’s nothing wrong with the size of the regular Tootsie Pop. In fact, it’s darn near perfect. It actually fits inside my mouth. Not that the .85 ounce one doesn’t, but the problem is that I can’t put it between my cheek and my teeth. Maybe with some careful, long-term stretching, but then I’ll probably be left with Tootsie-Jowl. The other complaint is that the jumbo pops are wrapped in some sort of plasticized paper instead of the classic waxed paper. While this may provide a better seal on the candy (I think they hot melt it to the stick or something) this makes it frustrating to open and the wrapper simply cannot be used to wrap back around the partially eaten pop ... it just pops open unless you use some tape on it. (I usually save the wrapper to wrap up my stick that may be, well, sticky, and put it in my bag until I can dispose of it properly if need be.)

    image

    I love Tootsie Pops, they’re an ideal summer candy, as they have no melting issues but still offer a sightly chocolatey flavor.

    My ranking of the current flavor offerings:

    1. Orange
    2. Grape
    3. Chocolate
    4. Raspberry
    5. Lime
    6. Cherry

    Your mileage may vary. I give the traditional Tootsie Pops a 9 out of 10 ... the new jumbo sized ones get a 7 out of 10 ... yeah, size matters. Tootsie Pops also come in miniatures, which look about the size of a Dum Dum pop. I’ve had them before, I tend to pull the stick out right away and crunch it up (rather like the old Tootsie Pop Drops). Read more about the history of the Tootsie Pop at their site and their TV spots.

    Here’s the classic one:

    Here’s the new one:

    Which do you prefer?

     

    Name: Tootsie Pops
      RATING:
    • 10 SUPERB
    • 9 YUMMY
    • 8 TASTY
    • 7 WORTH IT
    • 6 TEMPTING
    • 5 PLEASANT
    • 4 BENIGN
    • 3 UNAPPEALING
    • 2 APPALLING
    • 1 INEDIBLE
    Brand: Tootsie
    Place Purchased: 7-11 (Hollywood)
    Price: $.25 regular $.39 jumbo
    Size: .60 ounces & .85 ounces
    Calories per ounce: unknown
    Categories: Chew, Hard Candy, United States, Tootsie

    POSTED BY Cybele AT 7:59 am     Comments (26)

    Wednesday, June 20, 2007

    Head to Head: Twisted vs Take 5

    TwistedSometimes I wonder if these energy bars are really better than plain old candy bars. Back in the depression candy bars were meal replacements. Many were packed with nuts and over two ounces, which made them a pretty cheap source of satisfying calories at a nickle.

    Of course the object these days is not the maximum number of calories per ounce, but how good the nutrition profile is.

    Take 5When I want a little lasting energy & snack, I usually reach for some sort of nutty bar, as they tend to have a good amount of protein. Payday bars are always dependable. But I’m also a fan of Lara Bars, which are basically mashed up almonds and dates with a few spices thrown in. At about twice the price though, I often grab the Payday ... and I don’t feel that bad about it.

    TwistedAt the 7-11 I spied this little bar in a red metallic wrapper. It’s called Twisted, a “four layered protein bar” features pretzels, caramel, peanuts, nougat and a chocolate coating.

    This sounded familiar. In fact, it looked familiar ... very familiar. The Take 5 features pretzels, caramel, peanuts, peanut butter and milk chocolate. Wow, not much difference there ... even in the ordering of the elements.

    The price?

    Well, Twisted was $1.29 and a Take 5 is $.89 at the 7-11.

    The taste?

    Take 5I’ve reviewed the Take 5 before and I stand by it. It’s a good bar with a lot of variety of texture in it, not too sweet and because it’s in two pieces, it’s easy to have a little now, have a little later.

    The Twisted bar is merely a Tiger’s Milk bar covered in weak chocolate with a pretzel thrown in. It smells like baby formula. It seriously tasted like I was chomping on vitamin leather or something. I often enjoy things that are rather unpalatable, just because I’m fascinated by all the different flavors there are and maybe catty things I can say about it. I didn’t enjoy this, even for the prospect of reviewing it. Luckily the two piece format of the Take 5 meant that I had a palate cleansing second piece at hand.

    So you might feel like you’re doing the right thing when you eat this lower calorie version of a Take 5, but you’re certainly not going to enjoy it.

    I have to admit that it’s probably unfair to match a candy bar with an energy bar ... but hey, that’s the breaks. They started it by packaging it to look an awful lot like the Take 5.

    For some other balanced reviews of snack bars, check out I Ate a Pie’s special roundup from earlier this year.

    Nutrition versus Taste
    Bar Twisted Take 5
    Size 1.62 ounces 1.5 ounces
    Fat Grams 6 g (9%) 10 g (15%)
    Sodium 150 mg (6%) 180 mg (8%)
    Protein 15 g (30%) 4 g
    Carbs 21 g (7%) 26 g (95)
    Calories 190 210
    Brand Premier Nutrition Hershey
    Dietary Status none Kosher
    Rating 2 out of 10 9 out of 10

    POSTED BY Cybele AT 1:17 pm     Comments (8)

    Poll Results - Movies & Summer Candies

    I’ve been a little remiss in posting the results of the polls, but here they are:

    image

    Fudge, Cotton Candy & Frozen Bananas topped the summer treats poll. I voted for frozen bananas, but I might change that if I ever try a deep fried candy bar.

    image

    I was really surprised that Junior Mints are so much more popular than other movie candy ... even more surprised because I don’t always see it as an option at the theater. While there were a few items on the Summer list that I don’t care much for, I’d pretty much eat any of these. (Yes, I voted for Junior Mints, too!)

    POSTED BY Cybele AT 6:42 am     CandyFun StuffPollsComments (6)

    Tuesday, June 19, 2007

    Good & Plenty (Fresh from the Factory)

    Fresh Good & PlentyLicorice pastilles have been made for hundreds of years in different varieties and recipes by just about every country in Europe. America has their own very popular brand, Good & Plenty.

    They’re simply a little nibble of licorice covered in a thin sugar shell. Rather like a Jordan Almond, the shell is added in a process called panning, where a sugar syrup is added to the little licorice bites and tumbled and dried and then colored. Good & Plenty come in only two colors, pink and white. (Most other licorice pastilles come in pastels or bright colors, like the version made by Jelly Belly Confections.)

    Most licorice pastilles are expensive, but Good & Plenty are surprisingly affordable, probably because they don’t have as much of a candy shell as some others.

    The flavor of Good & Plenty is more complex, I think, than some of the European pastilles. First, the sugar coating doesn’t completely contain the licorice flavor so when you stick your nose into a movie-sized box of Good & Plenty and you get a woodsy whiff of anise. The sugar shell isn’t very crunchy, in fact, it’s a little grainy, but it works pretty well for Good & Plenty, letting the flavor permeate. The licorice itself has a high sweet overtone and then the molasses hits, dark and slightly burnt and with a light salty bite. After it’s gone there’s a lingering sweetness and clean licorice/anise flavor ... until you pop the next few in your mouth.

    image

    For this review I tried both the new Fresh from the Factory Good & Plenty and a rather fresh box from the convenience store near the office. There were a couple of differences. The molasses flavor seemed a little more pronounced in the FFTF&P and the sugar shell seemed a little softer. The still-fresh-in-the-box Good & Plenty had a mellower, more licorice-intense flavor and a slightly stronger shell. (It might have been my imagination, but the FFTF ones also looked a bit plump.)

    While some of the other Fresh from the Factory offerings seem a bit steep in price, the Good & Plenty version, in a 4 pound tub is a bit better deal for $25 ($6.24 per pound). The window to order has closed at the moment (though I believe they’ll cycle through again). Good & Plenty in bulk on the internet is $3.90 a pound for 5 pounds ... or $3.24 a pound for 10 pounds, so it’s not like there aren’t deals out there.

    I’ve found the sealed plastic peg bags sold at the grocery or drug stores are the freshest, the boxed Good & Plenty can be tough. But then again, I like mine tough, the candy shell is more crackly and of course it takes longer to eat. While I love Good & Plenty and it’s one of the few candies that I still purchase on a regular basis even with all the other stuff I have to get through, sometimes I prefer the crisper shell of the European varieties (but not the steep price).

    Good & Plenty is one of America’s oldest continuously produced candy brands, here are a few moments in their corporate history:

    Good & Plenty

  • 1893 - Good & Plenty introduced by Quaker City Confectionery Company (Philadelphia, PA)
  • 1973 - Good & Plenty sold to Warner Lambert
  • 1981 - Warner Lambert sells Good & Plenty to Switzer of St. Louis where it’s later all rolled in to the brand Leaf (a subsidiary of Beatrice) which already includes Jolly Rancher candies
  • 1983 - Leaf and its brands is sold to Finnish company Huhtamaki Oy

  • 1996 - Leaf and all its brands including Switzer Licorice, Whoppers, Milk Duds and Good & Plenty sold to Hershey’s
  • 1997 - St. Louis manufacturing for Good & Plenty moved to Memphis, Tennessee.
  • Though the company has changed hands a few times and even moved factories (at least three different locations that I know of), the packaging has stayed pretty much the same. A little box with Good & Plenty candies pictured on the the outside and the name inside a circle ... when I was a kid it had a black background, now it’s a purple one. The black, pink & white color combination is often known as “good & plenty” in crafting and decorating circles. Somewhere along the way it dropped the more formal “and” in favor of an ampersand, probably when they became part of Hershey’s.

    For many years Good & Plenty was also known for their cartoon mascot, Choo Choo Charlie. I found this video on YouTube of an old commercial:

    These sorts of ads are probably not going to be around any longer, advertising candy to children is going away. Though candy offers empty calories, it does have some highlights. Candies like Good & Plenty make it easy for kids to share, learn portioning and resealable boxes reward self-restraint. Many boxes were also pretty versatile ... you could shake your box as a percussion instrument when it has candy in it and when empty, you can blow into it like a reed instrument. The current boxes don’t have the tucked tab design that do that ... the day they got rid of those was the day the music died.

    Good & Plenty is made with wheat flour so is unsuitable for those with wheat allergies or gluten-intolerance. It’s also colored with Carmine derived from insects and therefore not suitable for vegans. Good & Plenty are certified Kosher.

    Links:

  • Candy Addict’s FFTF Good & Plenty review
  • Patti’s Candy Yum Yum review
  • Candy Addict’s Twizzler’s FFTF review (I totally agree with everything he said)

  • Good & Plenty is listed as one of the top arousing scents for women (yeah, if you’re looking for some lovin’ splurge for the super-scented Fresh from the Factory).

    Name: Good & Plenty
      RATING:
    • 10 SUPERB
    • 9 YUMMY
    • 8 TASTY
    • 7 WORTH IT
    • 6 TEMPTING
    • 5 PLEASANT
    • 4 BENIGN
    • 3 UNAPPEALING
    • 2 APPALLING
    • 1 INEDIBLE
    Brand: Hershey's
    Place Purchased: samples from Hershey's
    Price: $25 plus shipping
    Size: 4 pounds
    Calories per ounce: 94
    Categories: Licorice, United States, Hershey, Kosher

    POSTED BY Cybele AT 7:39 am     Comments (45)

  • Page 383 of 565 pages ‹ First  < 381 382 383 384 385 >  Last ›

    Meticulously photographed and documented reviews of candy from around the world. And the occasional other sweet adventures. Open your mouth, expand your mind.

     

     

     

     

    Facebook IconTwitter IconTumblr IconRSS Feed IconEmail Icon

    COUNTDOWN.

    Candy Season Ends

    4 days

    Read previous coverage

     

     

    Which seasonal candy selection do you prefer?

    Choose one or more:

    •   Halloween
    •   Christmas
    •   Valentine's Day
    •   Easter

     

    image

    ON DECK

    These candies will be reviewed shortly:

    • The Recent History of Brach’s Fiesta Malted Milk Eggs

    • SweetWorks Celebration Candies - Bears

    • Hachez Braune Blatter (Chocolate Leaves)

    • Rogue Chocolatier

    • Dandelion Chocolate

     

     

    image